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Get your ht

Brandon Handley 0:00
What is going on Brandon Handley here today with do the voice of a generation have a little bit of fun as I’ve got some guests over this weekend but uh, you know, what I haven’t done for you for a little bit was do a solo podcast and what I’m what I want to do is catch up catch you up a little bit with the Buddhism, stuff that we’ve been doing over on Facebook, I’ve had to push off for the past couple weeks, you know one of them. But I’ve got another that we did on Facebook with a Reverend Samurai and we did the Three Jewels of Buddhism. And if you’re not familiar with what they are, and they’re called three areas, which we can turn to, for refuge, right, these three jewels or refuges are essential to the Buddhist teachings. In the Buddhist times, when people wanted to ordain and become Buddhist, they formally took up refuge in these three jewels. The jewels are places where we turn toward in order to cultivate mindfulness and loving kindness. They are three different ways in which we may take refuge

Unknown Speaker 1:23
in our path,

Brandon Handley 1:25
and practice and I love the fact of the idea of refuge is somewhere we can go to find solace to be at peace, to be at ease to not worry so much about nearly anything else. As a matter of fact, you know, what I really want to do is, is, while we’re here right now, is look up refuge and see what the dictionary version of this is. So that we can really just share what it is so shelter or protection from danger or distress, a place that provides shelter or protection, and something to which one has recourse and difficulty. So these three jewels of Buddhism are places in which you or a practicing Buddhist may go and find Rhys bite recourse away from a place that they’re feeling challenged. The first of these three jewels is the Buddha. When we hear the term Buddha, when you hear the term Buddha, and we often think of the historical Buddha, however, taking refuge in the Buddha is less about the man who awakened and more about taking refuge in the Buddha hood with us. The Buddha taught that we all have the seed of awakening that needs to be watered if we are to liberate ourselves. taking refuge in the Buddha means turning toward the Buddha seed within we tune into the seeds of wisdom and compassion already presence cultivating these qualities and resting with them this I think he depending on when you listen to this and just recently released a podcast actually know what I didn’t release this podcast, I forgot to record it during the conversation, ah the trials and tribulations of your own podcasting. The idea and is that we are all Buddhas, you are a Buddha. Simply waking up to that idea. Right? So he says taking refuge is less about the man who awakened and more about taking refuge in the Buddha hood within us you are that Buddha within, you know, I’ll even I’ll even line this up somehow to Napoleon hills thinking grow rich. And what he calls the mastermind is the ability to call upon others mentally as if they were in the room with you. Right. And in. In essence, what you’re doing in that situation is you are vibrating yourself to that level of somebody or something within your own imagination. And when you do that, you’re able to just kind of call forth from the ether and ether and sit into that space. So you have the ability should you choose to say In Buddhist light to sit in Christ light right in nature and that is you know kind of mastermind that’s what they’re talking about here by taking refuge in the Buddha hood with a you have it within you you are that seed you are that as they would say in Hinduism, thou art that. And you’ve had that seed that needs to be watered in cultivation is such a such an amazing word. You find it a lot as a matter of fact, I’ve got it over here in the eaching that I spend, I spend usually a little bit of everyday with most days and going through it and the idea of cultivating that greatness within you. Right and and tuning into that seed of wisdom, compassion, it’s already within you, and resting in that space and being fine. Again, refuge.

Brandon Handley 5:57
Right, relax into it, relax into it. So you have the Buddha within you, you are a Buddha take refuge and knowing that cultivate that and be with it, rest with it, the Dharma. The second of the Three Jewels is the Dharma, or way. The Dharma is both Buddhist teachings and actual actions associated with the teachings. The Buddhist teaching offer a safe place a safe way of being taking refuge in the Dharma means that we study the Buddhist teachings and put forth the effort to utilize the Dharma in our lives. we meditate, take the precepts, and cultivate wholesome qualities, acting and living in this way is a true refuge in that we do not cause harm to others or ourselves and are able to find safety in the teachings. So the Dharma is both the teachings and the actual actions on if you ever heard anybody say, I’ve got to go do my dharma. And I was always confused. I was like, how do you do your Dharma? If that’s the teaching the the words right that there’s not necessarily a doctrine, but the teachings and the ways. But I think that with any type of teaching, anything you do, you must embody it. You must take action, you must live those teachings, not simply read, regurgitate, and mentally, you know, rehash and go over these things over and over. utilize it, put it into your life. And again, you know, meditate and cultivate wholesome qualities, acting and living in this way is a refuge. If you’re not in acting in any way to do harm to others for yourself, how often do you find yourself just beating the shit out of yourself for something so trivial, something so small, that with anybody else with any friend of yours, you would say, everything’s gonna be fine your grade, you didn’t do it on purpose, that type of thing. So I love it. So your Dharma is your teachings in action. And just knowing that, that that is a practice and knowing that that’s the life that you’re living with intention is like, that doesn’t leave room for guilt. There is no harm if you’re living in this way. So there’s refuge in that because you’re not going to kind of be torn as to whether or not you’re living in the right way. And within purpose, and your purpose is to your purpose in your actions or to live the Dharma. The Sangha, this is one of my favorites, right, the third and final today. of the Three Jewels in Buddhism is the Sangha. The Pali word Sangha refers to the community of practitioners. Traditionally, the Sangha is the community of monks and nuns. For laypeople Asana is simply a community of people on the path with you. It may be members of local meditation center, friends, that you’ve made in your practice, or those who sit on a retreat with to take refuge in OSI is to engage with the community of meditators. community is important in Buddhism as it is in many religious and spiritual traditions. Our meditation practice is often personal, intimate, but engaging with others is just as important. When we turn toward the Sangha, we are able to learn from others offer to help others and to use our practice to engage with others mindfully. practicing with the community often helps us to see things and in new ways working Other things which we had not previously considered. I don’t know about you. But there’s so many times as this final line, right is going to a new community and having somebody having a conversation with somebody, and them explaining something you thought you were thoroughly, intimately knowledgeable about, and they, they put a little spin on it. And you say to yourself, wow, I hadn’t thought about it that way. And your life has changed, your life has changed for, right, forever. That’s the power of just a simple community being able to reach out there

Brandon Handley 10:49
and do it in an opening way, in an open way, where you are receptive to new ideas where you are receptive to somebody else’s way of thinking. And the idea of diversity is that many people from different backgrounds, many different perspectives, many different cultures, are going to allow for you to see things in a way that you had not, as, as it says here, previously considered. The other idea is that is people on the path with you, but also the people on the way, you know, people on the way to the community, that there, there’s some excitement about right there, you know, people that you can see coming from a distance like, Oh, my God, I never thought that they were going to come to this community, I’m so excited to share some time with them and be with them. I don’t know that. Susan, I really think that way. That’s the way I think about it, though, you know, you see some people coming along the way or you’re along the path with them, as they’re talking about, as lay people, the community people that are on the path with you, you and I’ve met today, you and I have spent some time with each other, you are here with me on this podcast, or maybe you’re here in the video rendition. And we’re spending a little bit of time with each other. And so that means, you know, we’re we’re along the path with each other, it doesn’t mean we’re going to the same place. means we’re walking with each other for a moment, which means that we are here together for a moment. Now, it doesn’t have to be forever. Does that mean that’s one of the things I think that a lot of people get caught up on or hung up on? People come into your life, they’re just they’re likely just as quick to leave? What did you learn from that person? What kind of experience Did you have with that person? Hopefully, what were you able to offer to them as well? And how did the time that you spent with each other, you know, possibly benefit the world. I’m just kind of, you know, looking at this over again, and also, you know, our meditation is often personal, intimate. I think what’s even just as powerful is to meditate with a community knowing that just for a moment that your minds are in the same space and place and you’re meditating together, there’s a power in that, I don’t know that you’ve ever had the experience of, of watching, maybe a concert, right? I remember, I remember sitting at MPC boys concert years ago. And, you know, up on the we’re probably you know, three rows up or whatever, you know, three levels up and you can see the main floor and the main floor. The piece I forget what the hell it was for us. I think it was a Hello nasty tour. But their their stage would like move left and right. And it was like you could see the bodies moving to follow the concert and you could literally see like this Ying Yang, you know energy because of just how it worked, right? So you see energy in motion bodies in motion and people in motion. And and I say that because you know, you see you see that? vibration, you see that energy in motion in people and it’s very intense to be able to see that now. I know I brought that up in this one. I forget what minds and motion together. Right. So those people work together in unison. They had different kinds of objectives. They’re returning different ways but they were there together an in unison and seeing seeing that outside of you is pretty It’s pretty cool. I’ve seen it in a number of other different scenarios or if you go to raves or been to parties like that you can see people kind of dancing to the same beat. You see them dancing emotion, I’m sure that you always hear people talking, you know, Mark marching to the same beat. But some, you know, there’s, there’s something to seeing people liberated by music and dancing and motion and seeing that community in action together, same idea of even quietly meditating with each other, just that energy, driving through all of you at that same time. mines in refuge

Brandon Handley 15:43
right in the Buddha, and living their dharma. So the Three Jewels ladies and gentlemen of Buddhism, the Buddha, the Dharma, and the Sangha, we should be Samurai that is going live October 17. To finish up our last one for a little bit anyways, and that’ll be the Eightfold noble path. Look forward to hearing your thoughts on this one. And perhaps catching up with you on Facebook. Pete, feel free to join us for the Eightfold noble path. All right. Have a great evening, day life. Do whatever you’re doing.

Unknown Speaker 16:29
Take it easy.

Transcribed by https://otter.ai


FB 8 Fold Path Session: https://www.facebook.com/events/304193880897130

https://thebuddhistcentre.com/text/four-noble-truths

https://thebuddhistcentre.com/text/noble-eightfold-path

Brandon Handley 0:00
What is going on spiritual dope? How are you Brandon Handley here the voice of a generation voice of generation Heiser? You know, coming over here from the fatherhood podcast, I used to have that call to the voice of fathers to give a damn. So what are we here? What do you what is this community, this is a voice of, you know, spiritual spiritualists that give a damn anywho guys popping in here I wanted to share out something that we’ve just done recently over on Facebook, if you’re not familiar with one of the things that we’re doing over there, we’re doing a kind of a weekly thing with introduction into Buddhism. And we’ve got one more left. But so far what we’ve done is we’ve done the Four Noble, I’m not a Buddhist, obviously. So we’ve done the we’ve done the Three Jewels. We’ve done, the Four Noble Truths, and one of the podcasts that we’ve released already is the five mindfulness trainings. So one of them, I’m gonna go over with you today, the short version of them is the Four Noble Truths. And also do a short version of the Three Jewels, but I and I’m also going to link a lengthier version of these to the website. So you can go see kind of what that Facebook conversation looked like where I had Reverend Sam, who’s a Buddhist Reverend, on with me to, you know, to talk to about this. And one of the reasons that we’re doing it is so that you can approach Buddhism to find out a little bit more about what it is in a safe and welcoming space. And can hear that straining, love it, want to make sure that you feel safe, right, and it’s a place where I think that sometimes, for me anyways, if you go somewhere, and you’re brand new to it, and there’s JIRA there alone, it can be intimidating to talk to people that are there who look like super sacred or whatever. And, you know, you see a monk out there and you’re like, Hey, what do you do here, and it can, some of it can be intimidating, and you hold yourself back a little bit on those conversations. And Sam and I have created, what I like to believe is a very open space and welcoming space for you to come in, explore these topics, we share out the link. And you can come there with any questions that you might have, as it might relate, like I said, we shot the link. This one was the foremost noble truths of Buddhism, and I’ll share that on the page as well. And I’m gonna go over it with you quickly today, quicker than it took us are like, I think 45 minutes or so, on the foreigner will choose. So, the Four Noble Truths are perhaps the most basic formulation of the Buddhist teachings and they are expressed as follows. All existence is Duka, right? And the word Duka means suffering or anguish, pain, or unsatisfactoriness. The idea is that our lives are a struggle, and that you do not find ultimate happiness or satisfaction in anything that you experience. And this is the site this is the problem of existence. And we went back and forth quite a bit on this, Sam and I know that what he’s saying here is that there’s no there’s no way around it. You might think that you have different ways around it. You may think that you don’t suffer or have any suffering for yourself or any anguish, pain or sadness, but everybody does. All of us I have it, you have it. And so how do we how do we work through it? Once we know that this is going to show up? How do we work through it and that’s part of what we what what this is about. So, the second part of it is that the cause of Duka is craving says here that the natural human tendency is to blame our difficulties on things outside of ourselves. But the Buddha says that their actual root is to be found in the mind itself. In particular, our tendency to grasp things or alternatively, push them away. Places is fundamentally at odds with the way life really is.

Brandon Handley 4:59
And again, this was inside of you, right? How do you think about something that is that is happening? And and I don’t know exactly where we landed on how to grasp it them or, you know, we pull it them, you know, we leap to conclusions versus just kind of experiencing what’s really in front of us without giving it some how to, it’s challenging. How do you do anything? Without giving it a label, the cause of Duka is craving, right? So, things on the outside of you, right? You couldn’t get this job. So you got pissed at the world, right? The world’s against you. Or, you know, maybe somebody ran into your, your car and popped your tire and you get pissed and the world’s against you. And that’s a you wish things were better. You wish you were somewhere else and you wish things weren’t the way they were? And you feel like they could do better. And the thing is, you can feel a different way or have a different life experience if you if you wanted it or interpret it differently. So yeah, that’s kind of like the high level idea of it, right? We I think we spent quite a bit of time on that one. The idea again, is that there, the actual root of craving can be found in the mind itself, which kind of leads into the next next piece here, the cessation of Duka. Now this is the third of four noble truths comes with a cessation, cessation of Duka, cause with the cessation of cravings, as we are the ultimate causes of our difficulties, we are also the solution. I like to say, you know, as you are the ultimate cause of your difficulty, you are also the solution. You cannot change the things that happen to you. But you can change your response. I don’t know how many means I’ve seen with this one, how many and you know, set in, you know, different ways. But if you change the way you look at things that have changed how you look at things, they change differently, right? They, they change just by just by your your thought process and how you decide to see them. And then you can change your response to what you interpret is happening around you. So, you know, if you’re seeing a craving, and you want something for some reason, you have to understand where that where that craving is coming from what is causing that craving, and address it, right. I like to use the example of how when we want to move to a different place. We don’t like where we live anymore, we want to go move or live somewhere else. And then the idea is, you know, why? what’s, what does that please have that we want to move to have? That’s not already available here. And when you approach it that way, you know what’s over there that you don’t have where you are right now is the ultimate question. And what’s causing you and prompting you to move. And then when you take a look at it, you realize, well, maybe nothing, maybe there’s no reason. And then when you kind of when you take a look at it in that way, you you eliminate some of the pressure to make the move right to force yourself into any certain direction. So you can change your response, right. So the thing that’s happening is that I am where I am. And instead of saying I wish I wasn’t here, let’s say I’ve got everything that I need. Got everything that I really want. If I take a really good hard look at it so I can change my response. Right, so I got to get out of here can’t be here. Whoa. So now I got everything I need. And finally, so there’s a path that leads from Duka. Although the Buddha throws responsibility back on the individual, he also taught methods to which we can change ourselves. For example, it’s a Noble Eightfold Path. And I honestly don’t know what that is. But I do know this I do know that next week on October 3, on Facebook, Sam and I’ll be getting together to discuss the Noble Eightfold Path can also leave a link for that in on the site. But look, there are ways around it right. Just like we said here, although the Buddha throws

Brandon Handley 9:55
responsibility back on the edge visual, he also taught methods which we can And yourself, the one that I just use right back on number three is, you know, reframing it, taking stock, separating yourself from the situation. That’s a really interesting exercise you can do in NLP. Where you close your eyes, there’s a cognitive behavior therapy, it’s one of the two, you kind of close your eyes. And you picture yourself in your mind. And then you picture yourself doing whatever it is that you’re doing, whatever the situation is, feeling, whatever it is that you’re feeling, and then imagining that you are watching yourself, right? And what is the experience of watching yourself, like, you know, so when you watch yourself with all those emotions, feelings, and situations, and thoughts and ways of being? What is it that you see as the watcher, right? And then take it one more step beyond here. So now you’re watching yourself, watch yourself. Right? So there’s watching 1123 of us in this scenario, and, yeah, how much more objective Can you kind of become in this scenario when, in the end, right, the first person, you know, if you’re sitting with yourself, and you’re deep inside, you’re feeling the things, you’re feeling the emotions and you’re experiencing everything. When you are one step removed, you for some reason, you still feel some type of sensation, you still feel some type of way about all the things that are going on, because you’re just one step removed, but there’s less, it’s a little bit more objective. Now you’re watching the watcher, who’s watching you. Because one objective, there’s less sensation, there’s less things happening. And when you kind of watch the whole thing play out. And if you put one more in there, you put a fourth image of yourself being three times removed. It really just becomes you see somebody sitting there thinking, you’re watching somebody, watch somebody else, watch somebody else who just looks like all those people are looking at somebody just thinking, you’re so far removed, but you can separate yourself from yourself in that scenario. And when you do that, when you’re able to do that you for just that time you eliminate the suffering, the anguish, and you’re just an observer, and things just are what they are. So, I hope that was helpful for you to go through these four noble truths. All existence is Duka. The cause of Duka is craving, cessation of Duka comes with the cessation of craving. And then finally, there is a path that leads from there, the one tool that is shared with you there is helpful. And then on October 3, we are 2020 on Facebook 7pm Eastern Standard Time, Sam and I are going to cover the Noble Eightfold Path. I’d love for you to join us. It’s open to everybody just kind of come check it out if you’ve got some questions, and just feel like you know, this is this is all part of part of it. Right? The beauty is a lot of what we do here in personal development and personal growth space, is accessible with other tools has been around for a long time. And we can apply it in different ways. And they come from different sources. And one of those sources that we have available to us at all times is this ability to access Buddhism. All right, take it easy.

Transcribed by https://otter.ai